News

How to make herbicides work better

March 4, 2024

On Feb. 7, Dr. Tommy Butts, Extension Weed Scientist with the University of Arkansas, and Tom Hoverstad, Researcher at the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca, joined UMN Extension Educator-Crops Ryan Miller for a discussion on “Making herbicides work better”.


Record winter warmth, lack of frost should aid in adding moisture to farm fields

February 23, 2024

Tom Hoverstad has never seen anything like this warm winter.

“We can’t remember anything this prolonged,” said the scientist at the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca.

He said there is little frost left in the soil. In January, after a cold spell, the frost was 15 inches deep in Waseca. “Now we’re seeing very little frost left. So any rain we do get will go into the soil (rather than run off),” Hoverstad said.


Employment Opportunity - Research Plot Technician

January 31, 2024

We are seeking a Research Plot Technician to assist the horticulture program with implementing field trials, maintaining plot or rotational plot areas, collecting data, processing samples and organize seasonal work tasks. The technician will also assist agronomy and soil science researchers at the SROC on similar duties as determined by the supervisor.
This is a permanent full-time position with benefits. For complete position details: https://hr.umn.edu/Jobs/Find-Job Job ID 359540

STRATEGIC FARMING: LET’S TALK CROPS! SESSION TALKS MAKING HERBICIDES WORK BETTER

January 29, 2024

On February 7, Dr. Tommy Butts, Extension Weed Scientist with the University of Arkansas, and Tom Hoverstad, Researcher at the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca, joined UMN Extension Educator-Crops.

Ryan Miller for a discussion on “Making herbicides work better.” Specifically, this session focused on making choices and adjustments to ensure a successful herbicide application.


 


Winter Crops Day: Science and Community

January 16, 2024

An annual event to share the latest in row crop research connects farmers, industry professionals, and University of Minnesota (UMN) experts to discuss the upcoming growing season.


No records, but warm, dry November turns into warm, dry December

December 7, 2023

We likely won’t be setting any weather records, but the forecast for this week is still remarkable.

“It’s going to be much warmer than normal,” said Tom Hoverstad, scientist with the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca. “To set records for this time of year, we’d have to be in the 60s. I don’t know if we’ll get that warm.”


Rural Development Leadership Scholarship

September 29, 2023

The University of Minnesota, Waseca (UMW) /Southern School of Agriculture (SSA) Alumni Association works to support agricultural education, career opportunities, personal growth and development for fellow alumni members and their communities. New funding is available to encourage individuals to seek leadership training opportunities that would result in a strengthened rural Minnesota.


Farmers continue to deal with exceptionally dry conditions

September 18, 2023

MINNESOTA-Despite some recent rainfall, it hasn't been enough, meaning that farmers in the southeastern part of the state still have to deal with the drought conditions. I spoke with Tom Hoverstad, a scientist from the Southern Research and Outreach Center over in Waseca, about this topic. He said that most corn and soybean crops in southeastern Minnesota are close to maturity. That means that any rain those crops get between now and harvest season won't help at all. He said that corn and soybean farmers would like to get some rain after their harvests, though. That's because farmers hope the moisture will freeze in the ground once it gets colder. Once it warms up again in the spring, growers will hopefully be able to use that thawed moisture for planting.


Drought worsens locally, across Minnesota

July 13, 2023

MANKATO — Drought conditions continue to incrementally grow worse in the Greater Mankato region and across the state.